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How Do I Choose the Best Coffee Roast?

For the majority of us who probably grew up drinking grocery store coffee in a can with a 12-month best-by date, the thought of choosing a coffee roast likely never came up. Instead, we drank whatever coffee the canned grounds produced, and that was it. Nowadays, most people who buy our coffees understand that even the best coffee beans in Atlanta or anywhere in the world won’t produce the kind of coffee they want to drink unless they know how to choose the right coffee roast. In other words, today’s coffee drinkers understand that roast level has the single greatest influence on coffee flavor. When you buy coffee at Peach Coffee Roasters, you have the option to choose your own roast level and flavor profile.

Understandably, the inexperienced coffee drinker may not know what this means. In light of that, we’ve put together a short overview of each of the types of coffee roasts that exist. Once you know what to expect from each type of coffee roast, then you will know how to choose a coffee roast that best suits you.

How to Choose a Coffee Roast: Light, Medium, and Dark Roasts

Light Roasts

Light coffee roasts spend less time in the coffee roaster than medium and darker roasted coffees. They are also roasted at lower temperatures, too. Because of this, light-roasted coffees retain more of their “natural” flavors.

That is, if the coffee is a light-roasted coffee, it’ll likely have a light brown color and a mellow taste, with overtones of floral, citrus, berry, or fruity flavors and aromas. The coffee oils that are associated with dark roasted coffees are non-existent with this type of roast. Most of our single-origin and micro-lot coffees are lightly roasted and highlight the origin or country from where they originate.

Those who like a light, bright-tasting coffee with floral or fruity flavors should choose lightly-roasted beans.

Medium Roasts

Some coffee lovers like medium roast coffees because they represent a “taste compromise” between light and dark roast coffees. These coffees often have the berry, citrus, or fruity flavors of the light roasts, combined with some of the boldness of darker roasts.

The smokey flavor that is sometimes associated with dark roast coffees has not yet started to develop in a medium roast coffee, yet this roast isn’t quite as bold and rich as the dark roasts. It’s also lacking the visual darkness and oily sheen of dark roast.

If you like a coffee that’s a little bolder and less bright than a light-roasted coffee, but doesn’t have the burnt flavor of the dark roast, then a medium roast is best for you. We call medium roast the “crowd pleaser”.

Dark Roasts

Dark roasted coffees have bold flavors and lack the fruity, floral, citrusy, or berry flavors commonly found in light and medium roasts. They’re the flavor of our Red Clay coffee. They’re fully caramelized and rich. Coffee drinkers in the American Northwest usually prefer dark-roasted coffees, whereas the rest of the country favors the more medium roasts.

If you love coffee that has a rich, bold, and sometimes even slightly smokey taste, then the best coffee beans in Atlanta for your coffee are the dark roasted ones. And if you’re into grinding your own coffees, be sure to read about how to choose the right coffee grinder, too.

perfect coffee roast

Find the Perfect Coffee Roast at Peach Coffee Roasters.

Whether you’re a coffee novice or a seasoned pro, Peach Coffee Roasters has the perfect roast for you. As a specialty coffee roaster in Atlanta, we know what it takes to make the perfect cup. We even provide everything you need to achieve the coffee of your dreams right in your own kitchen. So order a bag (or 5) of our single-origin coffees, grab a grinder, and start experimenting!

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